What happened to LightLane?

Back in July of 2009 I wrote a quick blog post about LightLane that concluded with the following remark:

Unfortunately, it isn’t for purchase yet.

I just happened to see the old post, so I did some digging to see what ever became of the LightLane. Googling turns up results from 2009 and no mention of actual product releases. A quick patent search shows that LightLane LLC did finally get their patent filed in December of 2011. I searched for similar products and found a number of them. The best of which seems to be: EasyAcc Bicycle Light with Parallel Beam. There are also a bunch of other similar products such as the X-Fire Taillight with Laser Lane Marker and Pellor Bicycle Bike Laser Tail Light.

I can only conclude that once LightLane LLC received their patent, they immediately solicited companies to license it from them. I find the whole story to be fascinating and hopefully I’ll be able to piece more of it together. It seems like I should be able to find something about the patent in public records. I’ll have to ask my more legally-inclined friends.

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Mini E-Revo Brushed Review

Mini E-Revo Artsy Shot

I was always a remote controlled vehicle enthusiast when I was growing up. I had a variety of cheap electric RC cars, trucks, boats, a submarine, and even a beefy 1/8 scale nitro truck. When I went to college and graduate school I faltered from the hobby because I had neither much time, money, or space for radio controlled cars. However, once I started working full time, I found myself with the urge to pick it back up. However, I still don’t have as much space.

The Mini E-Revo Brushed caught my attention because it is small enough to run in my yard, but big enough to use “real” RC car parts like a 2.4GHz radio, oil dampened shocks, tires with foam inserts, and fully independent suspension. It even has waterproof electronics, which I have verified to be true.

First Impression

I was a little disappointed with my first run using the stock battery and charger. It comes with a 1200mah NiMH battery and a trickle charger that takes about 6 hours to fill the battery. The truck seemed quick and I could get it to wheelie by driving in reverse, then flooring it. All in all, I got a little bored of the truck after about a dozen runs. To compound the problem, the charge time meant I needed to wait a whole day between during the work week. A run with the stock battery only lasts about 10 to 15 minutes depending on how hard you drive it.

Aside from the poor runtime, the truck seems really well constructed. Durability was my primary concern because I favor the “bashing” style of driving (as opposed to racing). The Mini E-Revo doesn’t really have a reputation for being the most durable truck, but I would tend to disagree. The shocks lay in the body instead of on the towers which lowers the center of gravity and keeps them out of harms way when you crash. Everything is constructed from high quality plastics and the tires even come pre-glued. I subjected the Mini E-Revo to a number of crashes and everything has held up to the abuse except for the shocks which have begun to leak.

Post-LiPo Impression

After some mild disappointment with speed of the truck, I decided to go out on a limb and spend even more money on the truck. I picked of two 2S LiPo packs, a charger, and a parallel adapter. From what I read online, people seemed to suggest that going LiPo only made a mild difference in the speed of the truck. Perhaps they were referring to the top speed of the truck, because LiPos transformed my Mini E-Revo into a completely different thing! I remember when I first charged the pack and put it in, I pulled the trigger to 100% throttle like I normally would and the truck just did a flip in place! I was very happy with the LiPo upgrade because it really increased the level of skill needed to drive the truck and opened up a whole new world of trick possibilities: like jumping off a roof or back flips, jumps, and donuts.

The LiPo upgrade necessitated getting a few other things. I picked up some stiffer springs and heavier oil because the stock setup is excessively squishy and bouncy. The stock setup was fine with the poor acceleration and lower speeds I got with the stock battery, but I quickly found myself unable to land any reasonable jump with the LiPo packs.

Highly Recommended Upgrades

Part Purpose
Parallel Battery Adapter Connect two batteries at once for almost double runtime
Traxxas “Black” Springs Helps your Mini E-Revo handle big jumps
60 Weight Shock Oil Makes jumps more predictable
LiPo/NiMh Charger A balancing charger is necessary for multi-cell LiPo packs
Traxxas HC Connector Solder this to the wire leads on the charger
2S LiPo Pack A serious upgrade in power and runtime

Conclusion

The Mini E-Revo Brushed is an insanely quick, and reasonably affordable entry into the RC truck hobby. It doesn’t drive all that well through grass, so it’s better suited to pavement, sand, and dirt. It has a flexible chassis with a lot of after-market upgrades. The suspension setup is flexible enough to change the ride-height and convert the Mini E-Revo into a buggy or street car. The electronics truly are waterproof and I completely underestimated how cool and useful that would be until my Mini E-Revo went through numerous puddles, got hit by waves, and fell into a canal.

There is a brushless version for about $100 more. I think upgrading to the brushless system might be inevitable for me as any brushed motor has a limited lifetime. In contrast, brushless motors will last nearly forever as long as they don’t overheat.

I would still encourage anyone to start with the brushed version if they are even a little unsure that RC trucks will hold their interest for more than a few months.

Photographs

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A Side Project

I have finally gotten to the point in my life where I have time for a side project. I’m working with a coworker on a website that aims to rank the politicians of the United States from the sentiment of what people are writing about them on the internet. We are already in the process of adding celebrities and products are on the roadmap. Right now we are only ranking based on tweets, but have started gathering other information as well (tumblr, disqus comments, and news articles). The site, whatpplwant, is our stomping grounds for natural language processing experiments. I’ll be updating the blog there for content related to the project itself. Keep checking back there for major updates.

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Broken Download Links Fixed

I had an issue where all of the download links on the site were broke. I have no idea how long this has been an issue because it all worked fine when I first set the website up.

First, I discovered that WordPress had put any of the files I “recently” uploaded in the wrong place. By default, WordPress is supposed to look in the path INSTALL_DIR/wp-content/uploads for uploaded content. However, I looked at the source code to find that you can override this behavior with a setting in the database. Somehow, that had happened to me. I deleted the record from the database and tried again.

I was still getting 404 when I moved the files to the right location! What was strange was that these were WordPress 404 errors, not Apache. I deleted my “.htaccess” file and refreshed the page after clearing my browser cache. Direct links to the files worked, but obviously the rest of the site was broken.

To fix the .htaccess file I restored what I had, ran “chmod 666 .htaccess”, then went into the WP admin -> Settings -> Permalink Settings and changed the permalink setting, hit apply, then changed it back and hit apply again. This (presumably) forced WP to rebuild my .htaccess file.

All is now well again.

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Corrections

I fixed some problems with the post about Boost threads. The example program worked correctly for the most part, but only by accident. I had incorrectly assumed that the join() method started the thread. This is not the case. It’s a method that blocks until the thread is done.

The correct solution would be to make a “barrier” which has one method, wait(). When a barrier is constructed, it is initalized with a counter. Each thread calls wait() when it’s done, decrementing the counter. When the counter reaches zero, all calls to wait() return. The example in the previous post about Boost threads now uses a barrier.

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